Better outcomes
for everyone.

We have a long-term commitment to positively engage with the communities in which we work.

For us, community is as much a part of an investment strategy as the location or tenant. By consulting with the surrounding community we can factor their needs into the scope of our investments analysis, and develop a deeper knowledge of the market.

We can identify unique opportunities sooner for optimum strategies.

We support charity and community-based organisations both financially and through the voluntary work of our people. Charities we regularly support include The Sydney Children’s Hospital, NSW Maccabi, Cancer Council NSW, BINA, Kids Under Cover and the Council for Jewish Education.

Supporting-SCHF-logo

Sydney Children’s Hospitals Foundation is an independent Health Promotion charity, working towards a world where every child has access to the best healthcare, when and where they need it, and to achieve that vision they want to involve the entire community in bringing it to life.

Established in 1986, to date the Foundation have contributed almost $200 million to support sick children and their families, with a promise to deliver extraordinary outcomes for children’s health and wellbeing.

https://www.schf.org.au/

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Micro considerations

Infrastructure Changing our Cities

With an established and historically stable economic environment, Australia provides investors a strong platform for returns.
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Macro considerations

A Strong Australian Understanding and Philosophy

With an established and historically stable economic environment, Australia provides investors a strong platform for returns.
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Australian High-Rise Infill Project Melds Two Obsolete Brisbane Office Towers Together As One

Midtown Centre, an elegant, glass-encased new 26-office tower, recently topped out in Brisbane, Australia’s central business district. And with the exception of those intimate with the area, most passersby might never realize that the single building was, not long ago, a pair of outdated, 1970s-era governmental high-rises that have been fused together in what’s been described as a first-of-it’s kind project for Australia.
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